Resources

The Resource Library is a compendium of tools and resources selected specifically for the Accelerating Opportunity initiative. You can navigate the Resource Library by topic, or by key word (or tag).

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Starts with: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Model Development

Resources to guide the selection and development of programmatic and instructional models.

The Adult College Completion Toolkit was developed by the Department of Education’s Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE). OVAE developed the Toolkit to help policymakers at the state and local level implement practical evidence-based solutions that increase the number of graduates who earn high-quality degrees and certificates required to compete for good jobs in the 21st century global economy. College completion is a shared responsibility; this Toolkit also provides resources for adult education administrators, teachers, and students.

The Adult College Completion Tool Kit is designed to connect state administrators and local practitioners to the strategies, resources, and technical assistance tools resulting from the Department’s work. States can use this information to identify and implement state adult education leadership priorities, supported by federal Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) funds, which encourage and support adult learners transitioning to college.

The tool kit focuses on three areas:

  • Access: Academic preparation, financial resources, and other support students need to enroll in postsecondary education programs.
  • Quality: Evidence-based practices used by programs to ensure their services prepare students adequately for postsecondary education.
  • Completion: Administrative policies and programmatic approaches to encourage student persistence in postsecondary education programs.
2012
Michelle Tolbert, MPR Associates, Inc.,
U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education

This is a benchmarking and implementation progress guide for Accelerating Opportunity states. The Accelerating Opportunity coaches will use it with state implementation teams to first set a baseline measure of where the state is in relation to the nine elements described below, and then to track progress. As coaches, we will use this matrix to monitor states’ progress toward Accelerating Opportunity outcomes, with a particular focus on these nine elements:

  • Building Integrated Pathways
  • Scale & Sustainability
  • Culture Shift
  • Comprehensive Student Supports
  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • Professional Development
  • State TA to Colleges
  • Policy
  • Leadership and Staff Commitment
2012
Jobs for the Future

This Accelerating Opportunity tool is designed for use in developing and implementing integrated pathways. It uses a model integrated career pathway as the framework for examining the many components of a particular college’s pathways. This tool will help ensure a robust program that is designed around promoting student success.

State implementation teams can use this tool as a guide for ensuring that the pathways colleges design and implement reflect the initiative’s goals and advance its Theory of Change. JFF recommends that state and college implementation teams work through the tool together, using the results of those conversations to assess strengths and gaps both in the model itself and in how it is being implemented.

2012
Jobs for the Future

Minnesota FastTRAC (Training, Resources, and Credentialing) seeks to make Minnesota more competitive by meeting the common skills needs of businesses and individuals.

FastTRAC’s innovative approach helps educationally underprepared adults succeed in well-paying careers by integrating basic skills education and career-specific training in fields where new skills are in high demand. By focusing on high-demand fields, FastTRAC meets the needs of business while ensuring that students find well-paying jobs with room for advancement.

2012
Minnesota FastTRAC Initiative

Jobs for the Future works with districts, states, national youth-serving networks, intermediaries, and community colleges to reengage youth who are off track to graduation or out of school and put them on a path to postsecondary success. 

In serving this population, Back on Track was developed to reengage off-track and out-of-school youth by creating clear pathways into and through postsecondary credentials. We develop and scale these designs with districts, states, national youth-serving networks, intermediaries and community colleges.

To assist its partners in this work, JFF offers a comprehensive range of services, tools, and resources.

 
2012
Jobs for the Future
Jobs for the Future

In Summer 2010, Workforce Strategy Center (WSC) conducted a survey to determine the proliferation of bridge programs throughout the country. With generous support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, WSC now digs deeper into bridge programs to further advance the workforce development field. Moving beyond the BridgeConnect report, WSC set out to study how these programs work to position low-skilled, low-wealth populations for success.

This report is aimed at bridge program practitioners whom WSC hopes will learn from the promising practices highlighted. Policymakers will benefit from learning how these programs are working on the ground to effectively bridge individuals into postsecondary credentials that lead to careers. The report also includes video clips that capture practitioner and participant emotions and personalities. 

2011
Workforce Strategy Center
Workforce Strategy Center

Through Courses to Employment AspenWSI investigated the operations and outcomes of six partnerships between nonprofit organizations and community colleges. These types of partnerships represent a nascent field of practice, and nonprofit and community college representatives have noted time and again the value of sharing ideas, strategies and information about the nuts and bolts work of organizing and managing effective partnerships.

AspenWSI has compiled a variety of different types of tools that partnerships have used to support their work on the ground. The tools available today reflect a work-in-progress, and we expect to add additional tools over time. We welcome comments, feedback and suggestions for additions. The tools are organized in three categories:

How do partners organize themselves? Who does what?

What strategies do partners use to provide education and support services?

What kinds of costs are involved in partnership?

2012
Courses to Employment
Workforce Strategies Initiative at the Urban Institute

With few exceptions, most US nonprofits operate in a single neighborhood, town, or city. How can proven nonprofits increase their reach? In this article, the author discusses the challenges of replicating and scaling effective interventions, including knowing what should be scaled, having a strong theory of change, and building the right operating model.

2003
Jeffrey L. Bradach
Stanford Social Innovation Review

In "Change and Sustain/Ability: A Program Director's Reflections on Institutional Learning," Asera looks at how community colleges encounter, respond to, and incorporate ideas about teaching and learning, and the various strategies they employ to sustain productive innovations.

 

 
2008
Rose Asera
The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching

This letter highlights the joint commitment of the U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor to promote the use of career pathways approaches as a promising strategy to help adults acquire marketable skills and industry-recognized credentials through better alignment of education, training and employment, and human and social services among public agencies and with employers. The Departments encourage states to align state resources to support integrated service delivery across Federal and state funding streams and to ensure that interested partners and agencies – whether focused on education, workforce development or human and social services – are aware of this joint commitment for improved collaboration and coordination across programs and funding sources.

2012
U.S. Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Labor